Tanning Beds Risks in Causing Skin Cancer
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Tanning Beds Risks in Causing Skin Cancer

During the early 90s tanning bed is the answer if you want to get that perfect tan without exposing yourself to the harmful rays and heat of the sun. But in this day age you might want to think twice before using it because it might just be as harmful as the sun itself.

During the early 90s tanning bed is the answer if you want to get that perfect tan without exposing yourself to the harmful rays and heat of the sun. But in this day age you might want to think twice before using it because it might just be as harmful as the sun itself.

Members of the U.S. congress and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are considering stricter regulations on the use of tanning beds as studies link them to cause skin cancer due to UV exposure from tanning lamps.

A tanning bed emits ultraviolet radiation (typically 95% UVA and 5% UVB, +/-3%) used to produce a cosmetic tan. Regular tanning beds use several fluorescent lamps that have phosphor blends designed to emit UV in a spectrum that is somewhat similar to the sun. – (Wikipedia)

According to Dr. Darrell S. Rigel, clinical professor of dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, the more you use it, the greater your risk of getting skin cancer later in life. Studies revealed that UV radiation exposure from these tanning beds damages the DNA in skin cells and that excessive exposure can lead to skin aging, immune suppression, eye damage (cataract and arc eye when used without goggles), and skin cancer. Even the World Health Organization does not recommend the use of this for cosmetic reasons and last summer, the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer upgraded tanning beds from “possibly carcinogenic to humans” to “carcinogenic to humans.” The risk of melanoma increases by 75 percent when use of tanning beds begins before age 30.

Image via Google Images

“Melanoma” is a malignant tumor found on the skin; it’s one of the common types of skin cancer, and causes 75% skin cancer related deaths – (Wikipedia). It is now the second most common form of cancer among 15- to 29-year-olds, says the American Academy of Dermatology Association (AADA).

Sharon Miller, M.S.E.E., a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) scientist and international expert on UV radiation and tanning said, “Although some people think that a tan gives them a ‘healthy’ glow, any tan is a sign of skin damage. It’s the skin’s reaction to exposure to UV rays.” The AADA is endorsing an all-out ban on the sale and use of tanning equipments for non-medical purposes, and while it’s still under review they will support the placement of a “Surgeon General’s warning” on all tanning devices. The FDA currently recommends limiting tanning exposure in the first week to no more than three sessions.

So before deciding to get that perfect tan fast with the use of tanning beds, better think twice for your own good and safety.

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Comments (9)

I have never been interested in using a tanning bed. It just never looked right to me... and people get weird and leathery. Interesting read. :)

I being a redhead tended to burn alot before tanning, although many redheads don't tan I do.After several burns later.I discovered tanning beds which gave me a quicker tan in 20/30min verses the hours spent in the sun.However, I developed a fungus in a tanning salon,which ultimately took as a wake-up call.Sparing me from not only further damage to my skin but greatly saving me for the higher risk of skin cancer.Great article,

Toni Star

Good and helpful article!

Toni

Stephanie

After reading your article I laughed to myself....I love how you say all these negative things about tanning...and yet you leave out the positives. Like the fact that tanning is a great source of Vitamin D... and that we need the sun in order to survive. But what really made me laugh is that in your own arguement about the negativity of tanning...you point out that it should be banned except for "medical reasons". So if there are medical reasons that people need tanning then why is it bad? I take vitamins daily, should I only take them when I am really sick and ban them on every other day?

Thanks Stephanie for your comment but I think that you should read the article again. The article was about the risks of using tanning bed because of the harmful UV exposure to the UV lamps that causes harful effects to the body and not just the skin. It may also cause skin cancer. "Like the fact that tanning is a great source of Vitamin D... and that we need the sun in order to survive." If you read the article there is no mention of this phrase, but what was mentioned was a quoted phrase from an expert which I shall quote again, "Sharon Miller, M.S.E.E., a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) scientist and international expert on UV radiation and tanning said, “Although some people think that a tan gives them a ‘healthy’ glow, any tan is a sign of skin damage. It’s the skin’s reaction to exposure to UV rays.” She said that you might think that "tan gives you a healthy glow, but actually tan is a sign of skin damage." The body does need vitamin D from the sun and it's a given fact, but it is the excessive exposure or prolonged exposure to the sun which emits ultraviolet rays makes it harmful to the body. Anything that is in excess is harmful. The American Academy of Dermatology Association (AADA) was the one who said that they are endorsing an all-out ban on the sale and use of tanning equipments for non-medical purposes and it wasn't just a mere opinion from me. The AADA is a team of experts on dermatology. When we say that it's for "non-medical purposes" it means that it wasn't prescribed by an expert like a doctor. This article was not based on my mere opinion, but rather on facts. Experts on this field were cited and their arguments were quoted. I suggest youread the article again, and thank you for your comment.

Well said, AlmaG. :)

Thanks Megan and thank you also to Dione and Toni for their comments :)

Important for everyone to know!

A very interesting article with excellent tips. Thank you Alma.

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